Remote Learning Update: Understanding this new approach to school from the student’s perspective

The reaction when the call first connected was wonderful – like old friends meeting again after a long absence (even though it’s unbelievably only a week since we had a lesson at school). We cannot underestimate the importance of communicating with our students – even if it is just to say ‘hello’.

I had a fantastic video call with one of my Y10s this morning, student A (to protect their identity). The call was made through Google Hangouts, part of a new upgrade we’ve just had to G Suite across Hope Learning Trust.

Within seconds of the call being live, I was reminded of the two things we absolutely have to get right for learning to be effective; communication and relationship. Without these, there is no chance of developing trust between teacher and student and limited opportunity for collaborative learning.

During the time of being away from our students, it’s very easy to just assume how they are thinking or feeling and very easy for us to be wrong. We need to communicate. We set up the class video meeting this morning just to chat, to see familiar faces and to talk about our experiences of how it’s going. It cannot be underestimated of just how much is lost from not being there to talk face-to-face.

In York we’re blessed with fibre broadband and I have a 45-50Mbps connection. I suspect student A had a similar connection as the quality of audio and video was like we were sitting opposite each other in the same room. It was very easy to communicate. Others in the call found it difficult though, due to lower broadband speeds and this has to be considered, particularly when ensuring disadvantaged students have equality in what we do.

I read a really interesting article by Marc Rowland this week, helping us to think about disadvantaged students and, although student A isn’t in that group, the article led me to ask specific questions to check how the work being set by me and my colleagues was working in practice for them.

I first asked about the amount of work being set. Was it too much, too little or about right. Student A said it was “pretty overwhelming with how much there is to do”. There was definitely a perception that everything we post has to be completed. I wonder if we compared the workload we normally expect of students in our lessons with what we’re setting at the moment, how would it compare? On first reflection, I’m certainly guilty of over-setting at the moment.

A natural feeling of wanting to provide the very best opportunity for students, instantly, makes me want to share every opportunity I can find with them. I have to remember that, no matter how much they enjoy my subject, there is a bigger-picture need for them to continue to progress in all subjects. I am hugely bothered about their overall development so I have to get this balance right. My students also need space to think, reflect, create and develop so I must not bombard them with too many new ideas at once. Ultimately I want them to become more independent in their studies, providing accessible starting points, and sufficiently open ended opportunities, while also creating signposts to allow them to see progress. I want them to be independent, but for them to have the facility to ask for help when it’s needed.

I asked student A what they thought of the new content. They were very happy with the quality of content, especially with the YouTube Live lesson. Remembering again what I learned from the recent BBC experiment, about using the technology to extend learning possibilities in a timely and purposefully focused way, we must have the same approach to our new remote curriculum.

Student A also talked about how they were feeling. They’d been unwell with sickness the previous evening, but was much better this morning. They talked about feeling ‘not great’ (hot and stuffy) about the place where they sit to work. The place itself was ok – it was comfortable and they have everything they need, but it’s just being in that same place all the time that’s really hard. Student A is going out for a run once a day to make use of their opportunity for regular exercise. They are proud of improving their time to complete the circuit each day. They are also playing a bit of football in the garden to get some air.

The reaction when the call first connected was wonderful – like old friends meeting again after a long absence (even though it’s unbelievably only a week since we had a lesson at school). We cannot underestimate the importance of communicating with our students – even if it is just to say ‘hello’.

Going forwards, I’m going to set less work per year group and really focus on what I’ll ask students to be able to complete confidently in an hour’s lesson. My YouTube Live lessons at 1220 on Mondays will continue to be practical, but won’t particularly be linked to GCSE coursework to make them accessible to all ages and abilities. The YouTube lessons will be shared as an extra curricular opportunity and broadcast at lunchtime so as not to clash with other timetabled lessons. I will just stick to the 1 live lesson a week.

KS4 Music lessons will be simplified, featuring a single ‘Tune of the Week Kahoot’ as the starter for every lesson, rather than the current 3 Kahoots on different topics. There will be one larger project for students to develop over a few weeks with enough flexibility for students to work with their choice of approach. KS4 students can continue to email me at the instant they have a question and all 66 GCSE Music students in Years 9 and 10 can access and post to an open online Showbie chat to engage in collaborative community discussion for 7 hours every week (optional and at times fitting their schedule).

I haven’t attempted opportunities to play or sing together yet over hangouts. That’s for the future.

KS3 Music lessons will be even more simple. Beginning with a student-paced Kahoot, then a video clip to watch during which I’ll model a task on a given topic. Then time for the students to prove their understanding confidently, uploading their work. I’ll continue to have their class Showbie discussion open for posting comments during their hour lesson as that’s very popular.

For KS3 students wanting to develop more musical understanding, a 2nd lunchtime club, probably on Thursdays, is a place to share some of the other great work I’m receiving from other music teachers across the country.

It is more simple, but I’m absolutely determined that my students are actively encouraged to be creating music throughout this period.

So to simplify the simplifying:

Y7/8 Lessons

  1. Student-paced Kahoot!
  2. Watch Mr Lowe demo video
  3. Have a go and post your work on Showbie
  4. Showbie Class Discussion open during lesson time

Y9/10 Lessons

  1. Student-paced Tune of the Week Kahoot!
  2. Continue with single focused project
  3. Post work to Showbie for feedback or help
  4. Showbie Class Discussions combined for 66 students, open 7hrs per week
  5. Email questions 24/7 when students think of them

Music Extra Curricular

Mondays 1220 – YouTube Live Composing for Everybody

Thursdays 1220 – KS3 The ‘We Want More Music’ Club

Special thanks to Marc Rowland for making me think and to Mrs Lowman for sharing the article. I particularly think this structure for every remote lesson will be very effective for all students.

I’ll continue to reflect and keep you all posted of how things are going.

Cover Photo by Jakob Owens on Unsplash

Remote Music Lessons for Y7-8. Status: EVERYTHING WORKS AND IT'S AWESOME!!

I write to you with tremendous excitement. Not only are things up and running in our quest to ‘continue music education during the Coronavirus outbreak’, but many many young people are now actively involved in music creation across the country as a result and already the standard is incredible! Here’s this week’s remote work. If you’re reading this as someone outside of Manor CE Academy York, we welcome you! Please feel free to try the Kahoot! challenge using the link below – I’ve set up this challenge to be separate to the one our students are using (to protect their identities). I’ve covered the cost of this – you’ll just need to download the free app to play. Please do get in touch if I can help you in your work. This is a time for great growth in music education for our young people.

Students are already attempting ‘Super-Mastering’ – two year 7s add an improvised electric guitar solo using the minor pentatonic mode

I write to you with tremendous excitement. Not only are things up and running in our quest to ‘continue music education during the Coronavirus outbreak’, but many many young people are now actively involved in music creation across the country as a result and already the standard is incredible! Here’s this week’s remote work. If you’re reading this as someone outside of Manor CE Academy York, we welcome you! Please feel free to try the Kahoot! challenge using the link below – I’ve set up this challenge to be separate to the one our students are using (to protect their identities). I’ve covered the cost of this – you’ll just need to download the free app to play. Please do get in touch if I can help you in your work. This is a time for great growth in music education for our young people.

I’ve hidden the ‘iPad Help Videos’ link for security reasons.

Week 2 Lesson Instructions (23-27th March)

Year 7 & 8 Music, Manor CE Academy, York

Learning Objectives

  • To learn about the guitar in a popular song
  • To understand the assessment levels for this project with one week to go
  • To know what to do next if you’re loving this project and want to do more
  1. Information
  • Our testing day on Friday was very successful and lots of you have messaged me to say how much you’d enjoyed in. That’s great!
  • I’ll post your work at the start of each week. It’s up to you when you do your hour of music.
  • Don’t forget to join the ‘iPad Music Help’ Showbie group (code: *****) and check these videos before asking for help. You might well find your answer there.
  • I’m helping 472 of you at the moment so to make it fair to everyone, I’ll only be able to promise to reply to your comments and questions during your timetabled hour. The only exception to this is students who have me on Wednesdays. On Wednesdays I’ll be leading sessions for students of key workers, so I’ll support Wednesday classes online between 4-6pm on Wednesdays.
  • A few students are moving towards ‘Super-Mastering’. I will run an online lunchtime club for you soon, but I just need to think about which day
  • I’ve posted some additional resources into the ‘iPad Help Videos’ group so between that page and this you should have everything you need!
  • Other than your 1 hour of music, I have no additional expectation of how you’ll spend time this week. However, if you’re enjoying making music, just do it, because you love it!
  • Special thanks to students who have noticed things that everybody might need help with. You are Amazing!

Here we go… Enjoy!

  1. Your Kahoot! Challenge for this week is here. Click this link to play: https://kahoot.it/challenge/0710763?challenge-id=e9fb6ebc-c0f6-4196-9ce4-6f8eae4c847c_1584885802115
  2. If you’re not finished from last week (instructions below), there’s no need to rush or panic. Just crack on! You’ve got this.
  3. If you’re confident you’ve finished everything from last week and the quality of your production is the best it can be… watch this video about developing Grime/Trap beats in your music to give your music a more current sound. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ra41qQqKoHU&list=PLCwa5VlECOWw89VyTNtvpdV1eAKtzEBif&index=5&t=0s
  4. If that’s not enough, push on and attempt ‘Mastering’. Video Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVa4HHEcwa8&list=PLCwa5VlECOWw89VyTNtvpdV1eAKtzEBif&index=6&t=0s

Have a fantastic week

Mr Lowe 🙂

What does remote music learning look like?

… this is my year 7 and 8 work for next week. I’m testing it with y7 and 8 music lessons all day tomorrow – I’ll post findings from testing. Students tomorrow will be challenged to act as though they’re at home on their own, rather than in front of me.

… this is my year 7 and 8 work for next week. I’m testing it with y7 and 8 music lessons all day tomorrow – I’ll post findings from testing. Students tomorrow will be challenged to act as though they’re at home on their own, rather than in front of me.

Instructions below given to students on their Showbie account. Lesson can be completed on an iPad or iPhone.

If you’re reading this… have a go at the Kahoot using the link below, watch video tutorial 1 and (if you have GarageBand), have a go 🙂


Dear students,

In today’s lesson we’ll test an approach I’ve designed to make it possible for you to continue with your music learning when your school closes for the coronavirus outbreak. You must imagine you’re sitting at home on your own. Read the instructions below carefully. Enjoy everything you do. Good luck!

These are unprecedented times. We will go on with our learning in music and look forward to what we can discover independently. But we have an incredible ‘bigger picture’ opportunity – if we can make this work, we will inspire many other young people around the world to do the same.

Week 1 Lesson Instructions (test day, Friday 20th March)

Learning Objectives: Today we’ll learn about the voice part in a popular song.

NOTE: at the end of your hour of music, take a screenshot of your GarageBand screen and upload it to this page. Rename the image with today’s date. Also add a sentence as a comment to share your experience in this session or to make suggestions of improvements.

HELP: if you’re completely stuck and can’t continue without help, even though you’ve tried to solve the problem… write the problem or your question as a comment on this page. Mr Lowe will either answer your question by commenting back or make a video to help everybody. Help videos can be found in a new Showbie class (code:*****)

  1. Play this week’s Kahoot! Link: https://kahoot.it/challenge/055154?challenge-id=e9fb6ebc-c0f6-4196-9ce4-6f8eae4c847c_1584644464345
  2. To catch-up parts you may have missed from weeks 1-3…
    Watch Video Tutorial 1. Link: https://youtu.be/DJp9IINoN7c
    In this video you can learn how to record the piano, bass guitar, drum kit and guitar parts and how to edit them by quantising so that everything fits perfectly in time. Don’t continue until you’ve completed all of these parts.
  • Piano
  • Bass Guitar
  • Drum Kit
  • Acoustic Guitar
  • Electric Guitar
  1. Open GarageBand, click on the cog in the top right corner and change the tempo to 75 bpm (if you don’t do this, the voice recording will be out of time with the other tracks)
  2. Watch ‘Video 2 – Importing the Vocal’ on Showbie. Keep checking back to the video to make sure you do everything needed and import Anna’s lead chorus vocal into your session.
  3. Watch ‘Video 3 – Adding crashes and drum fills on chord changes’ and then add these parts to your session.

At this point, if you’ve finished everything, share your GarageBand project to this page to get feedback. To share your work from looking at GarageBand

  • tap the file logo in the top left corner (or it might say ‘my songs’)
  • hold your finger on the file for a second and release
  • select share
  • choose ‘project’
  • tap Showbie and add to this folder


Mr Dave Lowe
Director of Learning (Performing Arts)
Head of Music
Manor CE Academy, York

More to follow…

A solution to help ‘students who are not actively playing or writing music’ to find confidence in the understanding of music theory and language

This amount of learning is vast for an 11-12 year old student. That every single individual learner is engaged and wanting to do more, is awesome. The learning potential of this approach with the addition of Kahoot is amazing!

When I think back to my own high school music studies, I felt the freedom to compose and had the confidence to perform, but I struggled to describe my music and developing confidence in music theory was a real challenge to begin with. This memory has always given me determination to understand the needs of my students and to find the level of ‘breaking-down’ each requires to grasp a musical concept. Having said that, I was an active musician, rehearsing, performing and composing regularly. The challenge for a ‘students who is not actively playing or writing music’, is significantly greater.

I’ve written a lot in the last couple of years about the two GCSE Music pathways we offer at Manor CE Academy, York. Ultimately both cohorts achieve the same AQA GCSE qualification, but one course is designed for musicians and the other for ‘students who are not actively playing or writing music’. The two groups learn in completely different ways. All can access the full range of examination marks, but their approach to musical understanding is very different, with the ‘students who are not actively playing or writing music’ relying more on technology to learn and perform.

One of my major development projects in the ‘Music Production Via Technology’ pathway is finding methods for students to truly understand how music works and how it is described by listening. Importantly, they don’t have the opportunity to ‘internalise’ music as is one of the key benefits of playing an instrument. 

The biggest successes until recently were my ‘WordWall’ and ‘Tune of the Week’. Wordwall became a visual focus for all music students from years 7-11. Its prominence, covering the whole of one of the classroom walls, showing its importance for use and the coloured categories for each element helping students to see terms in their element categories. This tool has always helped with spelling and to help students to learn which terms are related to each element. However, it is just words on a wall and teacher explanations and demonstrations are needed to bring it to life. Brilliant for a whole class demonstration, but limited if used alone for students’ independent further study, other than as a starting point for things to look-up.

‘Tune of the Week’ was instantly successful as it took away the stigma students have of approaching musical styles they don’t normally listen to. Students became quickly aware that the first thing they would be asked to do at the start of a new week of learning in music was to listen. It developed a curiosity of what the next piece to explore would be. In addition, by studying the same ‘Tune of the Week’ as students in other year groups, some students began to have musical conversations between age groups, which is great for building a musical community bothered about what they can learn together. 

‘Tune of the Week’ was also successful by students using the TOTW template to answer questions each week. Students ‘knowing where to look’ and how to read the questions are aspects I’d overlooked before. Students quickly became more confident about writing down musical language. Together with the WordWall they found they ‘knew where to look’ more quickly, which is so important when searching through the 516 possible answers. 

Each week the activity is marked by student/teacher discussions, which in a 1-1 situation would be fine, but the waiting time for others is far from ideal. Students keep the record of the wrong answer and type the correction in the next column. A conditional formatted cell turns red or green to allow us to quickly see students who need more support. As useful as all this is, the activity takes 20 minutes each week so takes up a significant period in the first of the week’s two GCSE lessons. A restriction is that all students are given the same help, the same feedback and the same time to read and answer questions. The listening materials on Spotify, without lots of editing preparation, can only be played as full tracks, which is often challenging for ‘students who are not actively playing or writing music’ to unpick, as they ultimately will need to do for their GCSE exam. It certainly isn’t as ‘broken-down’ as would be preferred. 

Students learn simple musical terms first, then recognising them into the element categories. It is one challenge to learn the right word in the right category and to correctly define it by listening in a musical moment, it is another to have the confidence to write it down, and further to have the confidence to write it in a concise, meaningful, grammatically-correct sentence. 

A better, new solution using Kahoot!

The addition of the Kahoot app, has been a further significant advancement in the last three weeks. 

I took two decisions. Firstly to convert my ‘Tune of the Week’ GCSE resource into Kahoot quizzes and then to expand the method into the KS3 programme to help students to grasp key terminology earlier. I’m also currently working on the possibility of a solution useful from year 3 to 16 that could be rolled out into primary schools to support them. Into the future, this would be the ideal solution to support each individual student’s progress in music. 

Kahoot quizzes are easy to programme. Each 10-question Kahoot takes between 15-30 minutes to programme, including the time it takes to add YouTube video links. There’s a really helpful bank of Getty Images photos to quickly search for within the app and it’s easy to find suitable images. For specific theoretical ideas I want to show, just as I would draw on a white board, I can draw on my iPad with an Apple Pencil and then upload the image to the question.

The opportunity to display part of a video or a fragment of a notated score helps students to focus on the aspect they’re trying to understand.

I’ve upgraded my Kahoot membership to ‘Premium’ to be able to offer challenges to 2000 people at once, which although so far used only within my own academy, will eventually be offered to colleagues across the trust and beyond (at no charge). The premium membership also gives me additional question types, including the ability to request a specific, correctly-spelled, typed answer in additional to the multiple choice selections. It costs me £48/yr.

Students must type the answer with the correct spelling to be successful. It is possible to program a range of possible answers.

The greatest feature however, is the ability to select a very specific start and end time for my chosen YouTube clip. Using this, in addition to giving my students a full length clip to play, I can isolate a specific few seconds clip to focus their listening on the required aspect in the question. For example, in a focus on a classical piano sonata I wanted my students to be able to recognise specific melodic devices such as: scale, sequence and arpeggio. I chose excepts that gave students clear examples of these. Once discovered within the quiz, immediately students chose to discuss these using the appropriate terminology and discovering their meaning inspired them to try to use them in composition ideas. One improvement I will suggest to the team at Kahoot is to allow students to re-listen to the shortened clip when reviewing errors – currently they can only listen once and then listen to the whole YouTube video.

In the first week, the Kahoots were instantly appealing to the students. We always talk openly about how helpful the different resources are for learning and this new approach has been positively received. However, students’ experience of Kahoot-type quizzes before had been seen as a ‘game of chance’, which was fun because you could choose a crazy nickname to appear on the big screen and have some kind of online game-play in a school lesson. For this reason it was initially a challenge to encourage students to actually read the questions and answers, rather than just guessing the answer and watching the game unfold. I tweeted to suggest a period of time could be programmed into the game to prevent students from answering without thinking time. This was echoed by others online. 

But there was enough in that first week to suggest that this could be a very helpful tool, if I could solve the timing problem.

That solution was found by using the ‘student-paced challenge’ option. Rather than starting the quiz all together in the lesson, students received a link from me through Showbie a couple of days before the lesson. I could programme sufficient information to allow the students to begin independently and despite not sharing this plan, many students engaged without prompting. When I explained to the students that the question timer had been switched off, it was greeted  with much appreciation. Students told me how frustrating it had been that they didn’t have time to read and think before answering. The ‘student-paced’ option had majorly ticked the ‘differentiation’ box, as all individuals could take the amount of time they needed. Some students asked questions to confirm they had understood what was being asked and results were much higher instantly. It also became possible to be a ‘reader’ for those students who had that as an exam concession without the need for additional TAs.

Puzzles challenge students to sort information into a correct order to prove understanding. In this example the challenge is to sort the 4 2-bar phrases into the correct structure.

Another great part of the new challenge format is the instant opportunity to review the questions and audio clips they hadn’t understood. For many, this was the first time they’d understood what a sequence was in music and they now had an example to revise from. When played other examples, they could now identify all the melodic devices with more confidence. 

We’ve yet to test it, but the additional challenge to repeat the quiz 7 days later sounds like a good idea to consolidate learning. 

I tweaked a few things by the end of the 3rd week of testing (based on students’ feedback). The most helpful is routine. The successful routine for the KS3 experience is as follows:

All students arrive with better punctuality, looking forward to their music lesson

All students know the expectation to enter and begin their Kahoot at their own pace, recognising that the knowledge they’ll develop will help them in the practical work 

Students have 10 minutes to complete the quiz and revisit any problems, ask questions etc. (note the reduction in time from the original Tune of the Week)

I use the Apple Classroom app to lock all student iPads, which is their cue to move to sit at the front of the class

I model the practical task, directly based on the understanding developed in the Kahoot. This part of the lesson is short but allows time for whole group discussion with merits given for students who can confidently describe key aspects using the correct terminology

A set period of time to complete the practical task (15 mins max). The first 10 students who complete the work to the required (high) standard receive merits and become ‘Mini Mr Lowes’, spreading out across the room to support those who need help or have questions. Mini Mr Lowes may choose to develop their understanding further by solving problems with others or attempting more advanced tasks. All students have opportunity for feedback and help within the lesson. The environment for learning is electric and absolutely every student is on task.

We repeat the Kahoot at the end of the lesson to consolidate learning, as another chance to win merits and enjoy being able to confidently answer together. This is a choice for students – some prefer to continued to develop their work.

The lesson ends and it is a genuine challenge to get students to leave for their next lesson!

Students’ focus at the start of GCSE music lessons is improved by having the student-paced Kahoot at the start.

The most exciting aspect is the amount and depth of musical learning made possible for all learners. To show an example of this, these are the concepts covered in last week’s 1-hour music lesson for year 7.

  • Understanding a bass guitar, including discovering how it’s different to an electric guitar
  • Understanding the role of a bass guitar in a band, including how the bass player will listen to others to make their part ‘fit’
  • Understanding how to read bass notes from a lead sheet
  • Understanding and reading bass notes written on staff notation
  • Understanding note durations and rhythms including relevant terminology
  • Understanding metre and beats of the bar including helpful methods of counting
  • Understanding quantisation values and using them appropriately
  • Engaging in critical listening and based on findings, making musical improvements
  • Performing to a given pulse
  • Recording a musical part to fit dynamically and rhythmically with other parts
  • Editing a musical recording using technology to adjust note lengths and velocities
  • Understanding the process to develop a high quality music product
  • Understanding a positive workflow with frequent listening at the centre
  • Understanding the construction of a popular song
  • Understanding methods to develop work together as well as independently

This amount of learning is vast for an 11-12 year old student. That every single individual learner is engaged and wanting to do more, is awesome. The learning potential of this approach with the addition of Kahoot is amazing! 

More to come I’m sure…

Students at Manor CE Academy discussing analysis of Copland’s “Saturday Night Waltz” using Kahoot!